Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it.

Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

Date Added:
1985

This Queen Anne style residence features a two-story wraparound porch with a decorative balustrade. The front porch, with its Doric columns and triangular pediment over the entryway, exhibits elements of the Colonial Revival style of architecture. The home was constructed in 1901-02 by locally prominent builder Charles Jenkins. It served as the residence of Eugene Edge, an early Bryan businessman, until 1918. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1985

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
508 E. 30th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
1968

El Camino Real

Also known as Old San Antonio Road and Old Spanish Trail

A trail of adventure, hardships, opportunity and freedom, over which history stalked into Texas. To the Spanish, El Camino Real was a road traveled for the king – to colonize, Christianize, seek adventure or look for riches. This road became the most famous.

Its many parts were made, discovered or known hundreds of years before 1691, when Domingo Teran de los Rios, first Texas governor, joined and marked the different trails for the king. It was the route from Monclova (crossing the Rio Grande near Eagle Pass) to the missions of east Texas. Probably its trailblazers were buffalos and Indians, or Aztecs on trading expeditions. It was also probably traveled, described and changed in part by French explorer La Salle; by Alonso de Leon and Father Damian Massanet planting missions in east Texas; and by the French nobleman St. Denis seeking trade along the Rio Grande.

As the years wore on, it was traveled in 1820 by Moses Austin, as well as by thousands of settlers who followed him. San Augustine, Nacogdoches and San Antonio were its principal cities; inns sprang up along the way. Soldiers and supply trains used it during the Texas Revolution, Mexican War and Civil War. It is still followed in part by this highway.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
OSR (Old San Antonio Road) is the boundary between Brazos and Robertson Counties in the area where this marker is located. Although the marker is located on the Robertson County side of OSR, it is included because of its proximity to Brazos County. Marker is located approximately .75 mile Northeast of the intersection of Highway 6 and OSR.
Date Added:
1973

Great thoroughfare of pioneer Texas, stretching 1,000 miles from Saltillo, Mexico, to present Louisiana. The general route followed ancient Indian and buffalo trails, but the oldest marked portion, known as "Trail of the Padres", was blazed in 1691 under Domingo Teran de los Rios, first Governor of Texas. This part joined Monclova, then capital of the province, to the Spanish missions of East Texas. San Antonio, military nerve center of the region, was a major stop. Over the centuries, explorers, traders, smugglers, armed men, and civilians traversed this road. In 1820 Moses Austin traveled it to San Antonio to request a land grant from Spanish officials. The colonizing venture he started later brought thousands of Anglo-Americans over the road to help settle Texas. In 1915 the Texas Legislature appropriated $5,000 to survey and mark the route. The Daughters of the American Revolution and other patriotic groups sponsored and endorsed the project, and V.N. Zivley was commissioned to make the survey. In 1918 the state and D.A.R. placed granite markers approximately every five miles along the Texas section of the road. Today many modern highways, particularly State 21, follow the original route of El Camino Real.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
This marker is located From Bryan go west on SH 21 approx. 10 miles to OSR (Old San Antonio Road) E; marker is located near OSR stop sign at SH 21.
Date Added:
1966

"Bryan Station, Brazos County, Nov. 21, 1866...I hope a better day is dawning, for last Sabbath a Baptist church was organized here and 16 members united with it," wrote Mrs. Sara Dodson. One block west of this site stood first house of worship, a two-story frame building that once was a tenpin alley and saloon; the first pews were planks laid on kegs. Rev. W.B. Eaves was the first pastor. The present church sanctuary, erected 1927, is seventh house of worship since its founding and third to be erected on this site since 1883.

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Date Added:
1976

Among the circuit riders who preached to early Methodists in this area were The Rev. Robert Alexander, presiding elder of the district, and The Rev. H.V. Philpott, who conducted services in a hall above a saloon. The Rev. H.G. Horton organized this congregation in 1868 and soon raised $500 to build a church on this site, deeded by the Houston & Texas Central Railroad. A brick church, erected in 1902, burned in 1906 and was rebuilt in 1908. During the 1920s, an adjacent residence was bought and remodeled for classrooms and the fellowship hall. A new sanctuary was completed in 1951.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
On Houston Avenue between East 27th and East 28th Streets, Bryan.
Date Added:
1996

The First National Bank of Bryan traces its history to 1862 when its earliest predecessor, a private lending agency, was established by W.H. Flippen and Milton Parker in Millican. In 1867, after the Houston and Texas Central Railroad extended its line north to the new city of Bryan, Flippen bought out Parker's interest, moved to the new community, and merged his lending operation with that of Guy M. Bryan, Jr., son of the town's founder William Joel Bryan. Guy Bryan, along with partners Frank Clarke and J. W. Howell, reorganized this financial enterprise as a private bank in 1873. J. W. Fowlkes joined Clarke, Bryan, and Howell in 1886, and the institution was renamed the First National Bank of Bryan after being granted the eleventh National Bank Charter issued in Texas. The bank was housed in the Fowlkes and Ticby Building in downtown Bryan until 1919, when it moved to new facilities at 108 Main Street. Throughout its history, the First National Bank has supported community development, survived the Great Depression through careful business management and supported many activities during World War II, including an air base in Bryan. The bank moved its main facility to 2807 Texas Avenue in 1976. (1996)

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
north entrance of bank. 2807 S. Texas Ave., Bryan.
Date Added:
1970

Organized Nov. 21, 1867, in the Presbytery of Brazos by The Rev. J.H. Hutchinson, this apparently was the second denominational group in Bryan. In 1871, members themselves built their first sanctuary at Washington and 29th Streets. This effort was praised by Synod as "the way to build a church". A new brick structure was erected at the old site in 1906.

Organized Nov. 21, 1867, in the Presbytery of Brazos by The Rev. J.H. Hutchinson, this apparently was the second denominational group in Bryan. In 1871, members themselves built their first sanctuary at Washington and 29th Streets. This effort was praised by Synod as "the way to build a church". A new brick structure was erected at the old site in 1906. At present site, first services were held in educational wing, June 1958. Present sanctuary was completed in 1966. In its first century, congregation was served by seventeen ministers.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
1100 block of E. 30th St., at the E. 30th St. entrance to the Church, Bryan.
Date Added:
1936

Albert Gallatin participated in the Battle of San Jacinto.

Editor's note: The records of the Texas Historical Commission indicate that this grave was marked in 1936 as a part of the State's Centennial Celebration. The marker pictured on this website indicates placement in 1957, leading to the conclusion that the existing marker is a replacement of the original 1936 marker.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and FM 974 (north Bryan) take FM 974 approx. 8 miles to Dick Elliott Rd.; take Elliott Rd. NW approx. 2.2 miles to Bickham Cemetery Rd.; then NE on cemetery road approx. 1 mile to cemetery.

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