Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it.

Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

Date Added:
1970

One of victors in Battle of San Jacinto. Born in Ireland; came to America, 1820, and here to Robertson's Colony, 1832. A staunch Presbyterian, kept true to faith at risk of life. In 1836 War for Texas Independence, he served in 2nd Regt., Infantry, Texas Volunteers. Prominent in public life, he held Justice of Peace Court beneath shade trees. He married Elizabeth Downing, Londonderry, Ire.; had 13 children. Their heirs include noted Texans.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and FM 2818 (NW Bryan) take SH 6 NW approx. 2.3 miles to SH OSR; then SW on OSR approx. 2 miles to Mumford Rd.; then W on Mumford Rd. approx. 200 yards to Rye Loop Road; then S on Rye Loop approx. .6 miles to gate entrance to cemetery trail (on private property). Further instructions from 1993 marker survey: Walk through two gates to tree line. Large cemetery on right and on the left is a smaller cemetery with a chain link fence. Robert Henry's gravesite is located in a corner of the smaller cemetery. Near Mumford.
Date Added:
2012

In 1935, the Bryan School Board elected to construct a two-room, wooden school building for Spanish-speaking children for grades one through four. The site chosen was on the Joe Batts property along the new route for Highway 21, west of the city. The site in west Bryan was purchased by the city on June 20, 1935. The school was named for Reverend Guillermo Ibarra who served as the first pastor of Primera Iglesia Bautista of Bryan from 1922-1929. He believed that education was the key to social development, achievement, and success. During this time schools were segregated and it was often difficult for Hispanic children to get to school because of distance and the lack of transportation. The principal of the Ibarra School was C.M. Bethany. Esther Price and Philippa Stoneham were the first teachers. They could speak both English and Spanish. Students had mixed experiences, from being segregated to being punished for speaking Spanish. Breakfast and lunch for students was provided by the “relief program.” The parent-teacher association was active and put on a spring program where children would sing and dance. Citizenship classes were offered to Latin American residents who desired to become citizens. Boy Scout meetings were held at Ibarra school under the leadership of Pete L. Rodriguez and Manuel Herrera, Sr. On Friday nights, movies were shown outside on the playground for the community. Ibarra Elementary served children from 1935-1949 when it was renamed San Jacinto Elementary and served as a school until 1960. Ibarra Elementary School was located on the current site of Ibarra Park.

Special Directions/Instructions:
The site is bounded by the following four streets in Bryan, TX; Bonneville St., Highway 21 (San Jacinto St.), Saunders St., Lucky St.
Date Added:
1993

English native Charlie E. Jenkins came to America in 1873 and to Bryan in 1878. One of Bryan's most prolific and talented builders of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, Jenkins' legacy of distinctive structures has been recognized by national and state organizations for their historic and architectural significance. Jenkins is known for his masterful use of natural lighting and for employing many different styles. In addition to his architectural contributions, Jenkins also was active in the city's civic affairs, having served as both Fire Chief and City Building Inspector.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
Bryan City Cemetery - 1111 N. Texas Ave., Bryan, Texas. At gravesite in the center of cemetery, about 100 yards from entrance.
Date Added:
1982

This house was constructed in 1893 by prominent Bryan builder Charlie Jenkins for his brother Edwin James Jenkins (1867-1959). A native of England, E.J. Jenkins came to Bryan in 1878. He operated a drugstore in downtown Bryan for over 50 years and served as Mayor and a City Councilman. The classic Queen Anne style home, which features a domed tower and wraparound veranda, remained in the Jenkins family until the property was sold in 1971. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1982

Special Directions/Instructions:
607 E. 27th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
2001

Occupying a prominent corner in the southern end of Bryan's central business district, the La Salle hotel is an architectural landmark representative of the city's early 20th-century commercial development. At that time, Bryan was a major railroad stop between Houston and Dallas, and its depot on the Houston and Texas Central rail line (now demolished) once stood across Main Street from the La Salle. Completed in 1928 for leading businessman Robert Wistar Howell (1877-1960), the La Salle Hotel was the tallest building in downtown Bryan at the time of its construction. Austin architect George Louis Walling designed the seven-story building with Classical details and a distinctly vertical emphasis. The first floor included the dining room and coffee shop, while the convention hall and ballroom were located on the second floor. Roughly 100 guest rooms occupied the top five floors. The La Salle accommodated visitors to Bryan and nearby College Station, including families, politicians, society figures, business travelers and military personnel. The building served as a nursing home from 1959 until 1975 and was closed for the last two decades of the 20th century. Following a rehabilitation project, the La Salle returned to its historic use as a downtown hotel in 2000. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2001

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
120 S. Main St., Bryan.
Date Added:
2005

In December 1924, Martin Kapchinskie purchased land at this site, along a one-lane country road connecting Bryan to Texas A&M University, near the communities of Union Hill and Midway. Here, he opened a store for travelers and named it Martin's Place, where he offered groceries, a public telephone, gasoline and barbecue. The original building was a wooden, screened structure, with a small pit inside, and tables and a large pit outside. During the 1930s, Kapchinski sold some of the surrounding land to maintain the business during the Great Depression. By 1939, he had enough money to build a more substantial building, a red brick structure with a kitchen inside and a barbecue pit attached at back. The interior, designed like a cafe, included a tall bar. Following World War II, Kapchinskie's son Albin joined him as partner. Albin, who had served during the war as a butcher in the Navy, added a meat market to Martin's Place in 1951. A horseshoe-shaped bar replaced the original tall bar. In 1955, Albin purchased the business from his father, who retired to Michigan. As Bryan and College Station grew and the automobile greatly changed the way people lived, Martin's Place became more than a rest stop for travelers. Still in the Kapchinskie family, the restaurant has become part of local life and a place of fond memories for generations of Texas A&M University students. Longtime patrons of Martin's recall "Uncle" Steve Holik, who served tables from 1946 until 1987, and for decades area residents came for daily domino games and to shoot pool. Although the world around it has developed rapidly, Martin's Place has changed little from its early days, remaining a popular stop for rest and refreshment. (2005)

Special Directions/Instructions:
3403 S. College Ave., Bryan.
Date Added:
1985

Constructed in 1904 for lumberman and Brazos County clerk George Washington McMichael (1854-1904), this Queen Anne style home was purchased in 1912 by prominent planter Alfred Flournoy Wilson. It remained in the Wilson family for nearly 60 years. Outstanding features of the Bryan landmark are its corner turret, wraparound porch, pedimented entrance, and corner pavilion with conical roof. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1985

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
712 E. 30th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
c. 1969

On this site stood the first building of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Bryan. Completed in Sept. 1869 for less than $500. on land given in 1861 by the Houston & Texas Central Railroad. The first pastor, the Rev. H.G. Horton was assigned to Bryan Station in Nov. 1868.

Earlier services were held by pioneer circuit riders, including the Rev. H.V. Philpott who preached in a theatrical hall over a saloon.

The original frame building was replaced in 1902 by a brick structure which burned in 1906. Two years later a building of the same plan was erected on the original foundation. The present sanctuary was completed in 1951. The education building was added in 1954.

Special Directions/Instructions:
Inside the First United Methodist Church courtyard facing Houston Ave, between East 27th and East 28th Streets, Bryan, Texas. The marker at this location is the result of a State-approved local project. The marker was cast locally, which is why it does not resemble the more familiar historical markers.

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