Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it.

Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

Date Added:
1983

Designed by Houston architects Jones & Tabor, this home was built for Allister (1877-1936) and Nanne Waldrop in the early 1900s. Waldrop, a prominent area retail merchant, also served as President of the Bryan School Board. The Waldrop house, built in the American Four-Square style, reflects the architectural trend of the times toward simplicity of design. Interesting features include the Palladian dormer windows and the use of wood shingles on the second story. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1983

Special Directions/Instructions:
615 E. 29th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
1983

Granddaughter of Harvey Mitchell, a pioneer settler of Brazos County, Wesa Weddington began teaching Latin and Spanish in 1903 in Bryan public schools. She received a Masters Degree in 1918 from Columbia University and then taught while serving as Principal of Bryan High School from 1920 to 1946. A dedicated teacher who set high standards, she earned love and respect from students, many of whom became leaders in the community.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and Boonville Rd. (FM 158) take Boonville Rd. E approx. .5 miles to Boonville Cemetery.
Date Added:
2001

The town of Wellborn was founded in 1867 along the Houston and Texas Central railroad line. By 1874, with the first documented burial -- that of two-year-old Newton Farquhar -- a cemetery was in existence to serve the community. A reflection of Wellborn's history, the burial ground contains the graves of community leaders, including brothers and business partners Thomas Harvey Royder and John Horace Royder; veterans from armed conflicts dating back to the Civil War; Brazos County pioneers; and members of fraternal organizations, identified by the distinctive symbols on their tombstones. (2001)

Special Directions/Instructions:
4119 Greens Prairie Road West, near its intersection with Royder Rd., 2 blocks east of FM 2154 on Greens Prairie Rd., Wellborn.
Date Added:
1983

Built in 1912 by noted Bryan architect and contractor Charlie Jenkins, this home is located in a neighborhood where many of the town's business leaders lived during the 1910s and 1920s. Owned by banker A.W. Wilkerson until 1919, it then was acquired by prominent businessman John Parker. The home, a variation on the American Four-Square style, features a hipped roof, eave brackets, and a wraparound porch. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1983

Special Directions/Instructions:
614 E. 29th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
1997

(1821-1904) Ireland native James Wilson immigrated to the United States in 1842. He graduated in 1847 from Lafayette College in Boston, and from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1850, the year he was ordained as a Presbyterian minister. Wilson was sent to Texas in 1856 as a missionary in Brazos County. During his 53 year ministry, he served as a circuit preacher and organizer of many Brazos Valley Presbyterian congregations, including those at Wheelock, Bryan and Centerville. He married Laura Barnes, a published poet, in 1866. They are buried near the site of a church he founded. (1997)

Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and SH 21 (NE Bryan) go NE on SH 21 approx. 14.5 miles to FM 974; then NW on FM 974 approx. 6 miles to Macey Rd.; then N on Macey Rd. approx. .8 miles toNew Church Cemetery road, then NW on Church approx. .4 miles to cemetery.
Date Added:
2010

Designed in 1898 by Bryan architect George Washington Jenkins, this home was constructed for Julia Kapp Wipprecht, who was a well-known local philanthropist. Mrs. Wipprecht lived in the home until her 1919 death, after which her son, businessman Walter Wipprecht, moved with his family into the home. The house remained in the Wipprecht family until 1990, when it was sold by Walter’s granddaughter. The two-story Queen Anne-style house features a cross-gabled plan, partial-width front porch, textured shingles, and decorative gable and eave detailing.

Special Directions/Instructions:
500 East 29th St., at the corner of East 29th St. and Houston Ave. in Bryan, Texas.
Date Added:
1995

The rural farming community of Wixon was settled in the late 1860s by former residents of several war-torn southern states. The Wixon School and Wixon Cumberland Presbyterian Church were established in the 1870s on land adjacent to this cemetery. The earliest recorded burial here was that of Nancy Summers in 1871. Both the church and school closed in the 1930s and in 1968 the school property was deeded to the cemetery association. Buried here are many of the area's early settlers and their descendants and at least 17 Confederate Civil War veterans.

Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and U.S. Hwy. 190 go NE on U.S. Hwy. 190 approx. 5 miles to FM 2776; then NW on FM 2776 approximately .6 miles to cemetery gate.
Date Added:
1989

Founded in October 1895 as the Mutual Improvement Circle, this organization began with twenty members. Initially gathering in individual homes, the club met as a study group to improve members' minds, serve the community, and promote the cause of women's rights. Its program for the first year was a study of Greece. Among the club's early civic projects were the establishment of the city's Carnegie Library in 1903, downtown beautification efforts, and landscaping of the courthouse grounds. Club members planted a row of live oak trees along the College Avenue approach to the Texas A&M University campus. In 1909 the name of the organization was changed to The Woman's Club. Meetings were held in the Carnegie Library building until 1929, when the first clubhouse was built. Due to increases in membership, the club met in a number of different locations before the present facility was constructed in 1972. The white rose serves as the organization's symbol and appears on club publications and awards. The Woman's Club continues to be active in the civic affairs of Bryan and College Station.

Special Directions/Instructions:
1200 Carter Creek Pkwy., Bryan.

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